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The calm before the storm?Trump’s long-teased White House bid has been uncharacteristically low-key in first week

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NEW YORK — From the moment he left the White House after losing last year, Donald Trump has hinted at the possibility of a third presidential election. But in the week since he officially announced his candidacy, the former president has taken an unusually low profile.

There were no large stadium kickoff rallies. A man who has turned such events into a signature of his public life is remarkable. Nearly silent on his newly revived Twitter account, which helped fuel his political rise a decade ago, he has over 87 million followers.

He has not announced plans to visit the key early-voting states shaping the race for the Republican nomination, nor has he attended a series of high-profile interviews. Not held.

Veteran Republican strategist Scott Reed said the Justice Department is investigating Trump’s handling of classified documents, saying, “The fact that he hasn’t made a schedule makes it difficult to see if he’s really running. “I wonder if it’s just a business development opportunity, or if it’s a distraction from the DOJ’s work.” And his efforts to overturn the 2020 election are expected to intensify in the coming weeks.

Trump, who never held public office before being elected president in 2016, has never appreciated the rhythm and organization associated with traditional campaigns. Trump, who made the unusually early announcement a week before the holiday, said he was wary of distracting attention from the Senate runoff in Georgia on Dec. 6, which concludes this year’s midterm elections. The aide, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss campaign strategy, said Trump would increase his schedule soon.

President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 2020.

President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 2020.

Ian Maule/Tulsa World via AP File

But the campaign’s light-touch start reflects the hasty and chaotic nature of his announcement. This was despite midterm votes still being counted and some of his closest aides and allies urging him to hold off until after the Georgia runoff election. It also comes at a moment of political vulnerability unique to Trump.

The former president, who has positioned himself as the undisputed leader of the Republican Party in the post-White House years, is facing fierce criticism within his party for contributing to disappointing results in this month’s midterm elections. Other Republicans have also openly mocked their own presidency by making it clear that they do not support Trump’s nomination.

Meanwhile, legal pressure on Trump is mounting.

Attorney General Merrick Garland last week reviewed key aspects of the Justice Department’s investigation into classified documents recovered from the former president’s Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Fla., and another investigation, including Jan. 6. In 2021, efforts to undo the riots at the U.S. Capitol and the 2020 elections.

This image shows documents seized during an August 8 FBI raid on former President Donald Trump's Mar Arago mansion in Florida. This was included in documents filed with the court by the Department of Justice on August 30.

This image shows documents seized during an August 8 FBI raid on former President Donald Trump’s Mar Arago mansion in Florida. This was included in documents filed with the court by the Department of Justice on August 30.

And on Tuesday, the Supreme Court cleared the way for the imminent extradition of Trump’s tax returns to congressional committees after a three-year legal battle.

Still, Trump starts the race with a decidedly head start. The former president had been acting like a de facto candidate for months and had been a long time political manipulator, and after two presidential elections and his four-year tenure, he was swayed by state and local governments. has built a longstanding relationship with the leader of

Meanwhile, Trump has appeared at a series of private events. Last week, he hosted his two-day “Gala and Experience” of the America First Policy Institute at his Mar-a-Lago. This included a policy session, a Thursday night concert with country star Lee Greenwood, his golf tournament, and a Friday night black tie. At the gala, Trump spoke out against Garland’s special counsel decision.

Trump also made a video appearance at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Mexico and answered questions via a live video feed at the Republican Jewish Coalition’s annual leadership conference in Las Vegas. There, a long list of other potential 2020 candidates appeared in person, courting donors.

“As you know, our country is in very serious trouble, and I’m telling you it’s in the big trouble,” Trump said.

Trump has also nominated congressional leaders, including Rep. Marjorie Taylor-Green, Rep. Paul Gosser, Ronnie Jackson, Rep. Allies also expressed their support.

Donald Trump (left) and Georgia Congressman Marjorie Taylor Green at the Bedminster Invitational LIV Golf Tournament in Bedminster, New Jersey in July.

Donald Trump (left) and Georgia Congressman Marjorie Taylor Green at the Bedminster Invitational LIV Golf Tournament in Bedminster, New Jersey in July.

His campaign team has yet to fill a long list of key senior positions, but it builds the core of modern campaign organization, including hiring staff, integrating databases and donor lists, and negotiating with vendors. working for

This development is in stark contrast to when Trump launched his final campaign for the White House at Trump Tower in June 2015, garnering media attention with shocking remarks and ironic declarations.

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not doing their best,” Trump said at the time. “I think they’re drug dealers, they’re criminals, they’re rapists, and some of them are good people.”

The next day, Trump traveled to Manchester, New Hampshire, and ultimately won the state’s Republican primary. He then held rallies in Arizona, South Carolina, and Iowa.

And Mr. Trump’s approach stands in contrast to many of his potential rivals, who over the past few months have frequently visited early-voting states and made media appearances to raise their profile.

For example, former Vice President Mike Pence gave over 40 interviews in promoting his new book.

President Donald Trump (right) listens to Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (left) at a 2020 event at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump (right) listens to Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (left) at a 2020 event at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC.

Stephanie Reynolds/Pool/ABACAPRESS.COM

Former Trump campaign donor Dan Everhart, who said he would love to see Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis win the nomination, said last week that “some things we’ve suspected all along have been confirmed. It was done,” he said.

“Right now, I know that many candidates are slated to run for the nomination. At this point, no one seems ready to hand over the nomination to Trump or DeSantis,” Everhart said. .

“I also know that a lot of people in the party are trying to move away from Trump. Now DeSantis is the heir-at-law. We’ll have to see if he can keep that position, but not Trump. There aren’t many candidates who can challenge him.”


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Written by Natalia Chi

Chicago Popular; Chicago breaking news, weather and live video. Covering local politics, health, traffic and sports for Chicago, the suburbs and northwest Indiana.

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