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Rare bird nesting in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park caught on camera for the first time

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about a month ago Mauna Loa began to eruptchicks of an endangered seabird were seen on camera emerge from the burrow at the volcano, officials said Tuesday. According to the National Park Service, this is the first confirmed ‘red lake’ found in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, also known as the streaked shearwater.

According to researchers, streaked shearwater nests are very difficult to find. Because birds don’t leave much evidence. The nest was originally discovered by a dog named Slater, a member of the Hawaiian Sniffer Dogs, researchers say.

“Biologists in the park have known the presence of ʻakēʻakē on Mauna Loa since the 1990s. In 2019, ʻakēʻakē burrow calls were recorded during acoustic monitoring, indicating nesting. “The lack of guano-like visual indications at their nest sites makes them very difficult to find. Humans have to find them,” said Charlotte Forbes Perry, a biologist at the University of Hawaii. said in a news release.

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An ʻakēʻakē chick caught on a wildlife camera. Its nest is on Mauna Loa.

National Park Service


But when Slater was brought in, Perry said he was able to find the ʻakēʻakē nest and three other nests in two days.

Officials say the nocturnal birds mostly live in the sea, but they also nest on remote islands. There are approximately 150,000 ʻakēʻakē in the world, and 240 pairs in Hawaii.

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Researchers can be seen searching for nests of red-necked moths and other birds in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

National Park Service


Slater and his trainer, Dr. Michelle Reynolds, also found a nest of red moths at the US Army Post Pohakuloa Training Range in September. These two nests are the only documented ʻakēʻakē burrows in Hawaii.

Authorities say the bird nests found were not threatened by the recent volcanic eruption and encourage residents to keep their pets under control and use dark sky-friendly lighting to help the birds find their way home. Bright lights disorient birds, they said.


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Written by Natalia Chi

Chicago Popular; Chicago breaking news, weather and live video. Covering local politics, health, traffic and sports for Chicago, the suburbs and northwest Indiana.

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