in

Daughter writes hilarious and brutal Orbit for father in ‘Tough as Nails, Redneck, SOB’

Advertisements

The daughter’s hilariously brutal tribute to her late Illinois father, “a card-carrying, Ray-Ban-wearing, camouflage coverall-loving redneck,” garnered a lot of attention.

Halliea Milner said her father, Kenneth Kenne Joseph Puhlar Jr., died at the age of 62 after losing a battle with sepsis.

“Fifty years after the beginning of the crap with everyone and everything you could find to fight in Alton, Illinois, SOB, hard as nails, redneck, finally found something meaner and more stubborn than himself.” I found it,” she said. wrote in his obituary.

Milner said his father liked hunting, fishing, drinking, and “both country and western types of music.”

Milner wrote that Puller was some kind of daring devil, “probably invented the phrase ‘Hey guys, look at this,'” and that his father loved the outdoors and “raised his own weeds.” good at” and “a decent carpenter on the way … if only I could persuade him to come and work.”

“Kenny was good at whatever he tried to be good at and was a wicked smart, but it was his best to do absolutely nothing but drink, smoke and listen to music. didn’t stop,” writes Milner.

Beyond his work ethic was his love life.

“Like all sad cowboy songs, he couldn’t keep his marriage going, but that didn’t stop him from trying.” I’ve been through a legal marriage (and divorce) and one common-law marriage, that’s what we know.”

Milner is his only daughter, and her father said he was “very proud” of her. — Let’s go by giving him his only grandson.”

she told TODAY.com She and her father were “great friends.”

“He’s only been mad at me twice in my life. The first time was when I was seven (accidentally) punching him in the nose. The second time was until we got oxygen in the house.” That’s when I said I couldn’t get out of the nursing home,” she said in an interview. “He was more strict with others, but he was a very caring father.”

So when Milner sat down to write a proud obituary, after being unable to find someone to do it for her, she decided to simply “put it out.”

Milner, “till the day he died,” proves that “even the biggest assholes (jerks) have a soft side. You may have to dig deeper to find it.” .

But Puller’s father is still alive, and he said, “I told Kenny all the best ways to be emotionally unavailable and still overly sensitive all in one.

“It’s a strong family trait that’s passed down from generation to generation,” Milner writes.

He also said, “It’s not surprising to see that he was equally demonic and lush,” and that he “terrorized and traumatized in countless ingenious ways.” ” Survived by all his brothers.

“From start to finish, everyone loved him to the end. It’s a miracle to see him accept the idea of ​​’it’s hard to love’ as a personal challenge,” his obituary read. is.

The obituary has received a lot of attention since Milner wrote it, with many comments praising the obituary.

“I didn’t know Kenny, but after reading this brilliantly written obituary, I’m sure I wish I did,” one person wrote.

This work also Reddit thread deleted.

“Whoever wrote this should write every obituary,” wrote one commenter.

“I can’t believe someone wrote it. I think it’s the best combination of honest love and generosity,” said another.

The family will celebrate Puhlar’s “old school Kenne style” with a party next week.

“There’s food and beer (Kenny’s favorite) you don’t have to pay for,” and instead of sharing emotional memories, “people start talking crap about Kenny and his life.”

The family asks anyone who wants to remember Pooler not to send the usual flowers or donations. Instead, “Instead, take a trip to the dollar store in Kenne’s honor.”

Advertisements
Advertisements

What do you think?

Written by Natalia Chi

Chicago Popular; Chicago breaking news, weather and live video. Covering local politics, health, traffic and sports for Chicago, the suburbs and northwest Indiana.

Leave a Reply

NOAA predicts more wet weather this spring to ease western drought

'ComEd Four' trial: Michael Madigan recordings heard – Crain's Chicago Business