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Chicago Police Department and Cook County Sheriff Partner to Help Owners Protect Vehicles from Theft

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With vehicle thefts on the rise in Chicago and surrounding suburbs, law enforcement officials are working together to help owners keep their belongings safe.

At a press conference Tuesday, the Chicago Police Department announced that vehicle thefts, burglaries and catalytic converter thefts have surged in the city as gun violence has declined.

Through an analysis of vehicle theft data, police determined that Kia and Hyundai cars were the most frequently stolen and used for violent crimes, said Brian McDermott, Chicago Police Department Operations Director.

McDermott said the city’s police district is working to help distribute locking devices that help residents protect their cars from theft.

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Chicago police officers distribute steering wheel locks to protect cars from theft. The Police Department and the Cook County Sheriff’s Department are working with manufacturers to enroll vehicles in the Tracked Vehicle Program. A registered vehicle’s location can be tracked in case of theft.

“It’s easy to steal them, and whoever steals knows how,” said Cook County Sheriff’s Chief Leo Schmitz.

To help recover stolen vehicles, the Sheriff’s Department and the Chicago Police Department are working with automakers to register vehicles in the United States. tracked vehicle program.

Anyone enrolled in the program can agree with the sheriff to track and recover stolen vehicles. All registered vehicles will have two of her identifiable stickers that warn potential thieves to be tracked.

“If people know cars can be tracked, they know they can get caught,” Schmitz said.


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Written by Natalia Chi

Chicago Popular; Chicago breaking news, weather and live video. Covering local politics, health, traffic and sports for Chicago, the suburbs and northwest Indiana.

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